England and Spain AGI

Program Info.

Program Description.

The purpose of the AGI is attributed to management scholar Henry Mintzberg who argues that it is far more important for individuals, especially managers, to be worldly. According to Mintzberg, the Pocket Oxford Dictionary definition of “worldly” – “experienced in life, sophisticated, practical” – presents an interesting mixture of words that are best reflective of what we want from managers and leaders within organizations. “All managers function on a set of edges between their own world and those of other people. To be worldly means to get over these edges from time to time, into those worlds – other cultures, other organizations, other functions in their own organization, above all the thinking of other people – so as to understand their own world more deeply. To paraphrase a line by T.S. Eliot that has been overused for good reason, managers should be exploring ceaselessly in order to return home and know the place for the first time. That is the worldly mindset.” [From H. Mintzberg. 2009. Managing. San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler Publishers, Inc., p. 212.]

The planned experiences, and thus learning outcomes for the AGI, are rooted in the history and application of OD as well as the Jesuit Catholic history. Upon completion of the AGI, students will have a renewed perspective of organization development and its application inclusive of the Jesuit leadership tradition as it pertains to the greater Bay Area and beyond.