Syllabus Example - LAS Directed Study

Class Information

LAS Directed Study – Study Abroad Immersion Course
BELIZE: Youth, Immigration, & Identity
Tuesdays 3:00 – 4:50pm – K-Hall 334
Instructor: Roberto Varea
E-mail: varea@usfca.edu
Office Phone: 422-2071
Office: KH 334
Office Hrs: Wed. 11:00am / 2:00 pm

Introduction

This directed study course prepares STUDENT to complete the study-abroad immersion requirement in her Latin American Studies Major, by traveling to Belize, Central America, and then producing a Final Paper. The course is designed for 4 credits. As part of this 4-unit course the student meets with instructor to outline different thematic options, and then travels with Project Learn Belize under USF’s School of Education for 2 weeks during Intersession 2019. The immersion takes the student to the community of Dangriga, Belize, where she teaches and interviews children in Sacred Heart School.

Course Description

BELIZE: Youth, Immigration, & Identity engages the intersection of Immigration and Identity processes as they affect youth in Belize in an educational setting. Research work will reflect Belize’s youth sense of self and belonging at a time of a large Central American migratory movement to the United States, against the backdrop of the unique place that the local culture holds in a Spanish-majority region, and their particular history of European colonization.

The course starts with a historical contextualization, particularly focusing on the Garifuna community, and other atypical migratory currents to the region, such as the Chinese. It will address how this diversity impacted the ethnic and cultural landscape of Belize and their particular sense of belonging, as well as how this influenced the socioeconomic spectrum of those attending Catholic education. Finally, it will also reflect on how these markers are currently affected by the more recent reality of immigration.

About Project Learn Belize

Education must address both hearts and minds; it must attend to all dimensions – social, cultural, health, economic, spiritual – that allow true learning to occur. In addition to working with children, USF students and faculty immerse themselves in the culture of Belize, growing in solidarity and learning more about this culturally rich nation. Today, volunteers and students are sponsored by Project Learn Belize in a variety of capacities, including the Teacher-to-Teacher exchange, the Teacher Assistant Program, and the SONHP Health Advocacy Program through USF’s School of Nursing.

Learning Outcomes

  • Student will articulate her understanding of and differentiate critical periods in the history of Belize in the larger context of Central American and Caribbean colonization.
    This will be assessed through individualized discussions on the readings and written assignments, short response papers, and final paper.
  • Student will engage examples of and articulate her response to the historical and current role of immigration on the cultural landscape of Belize, and its socioeconomic ramifications.
    This will be assessed through individualized discussions on the readings and written assignments, short response papers, and final paper.
  • Student will express in a thorough and articulate manner and in written form, her understanding of the impact of socioeconomic forces on the educational system and in particular, on Belize’s youth.
    This will be assessed through individualized discussions on the readings and written assignments, short response papers, and final paper.
  • Student will express in a thorough and articulate manner and in written form, her understanding of the impact of immigration on Belize’s diverse communities, and in particular, on its youth.
    This will be assessed through individualized discussions on the readings and written assignments, short response papers, and final paper.

Course Requirements

  • Immersion Trip to Belize: Student will spend two intensive immersion weeks in Belize during the 2019 Intersession period (completed).
  • Meetings with Professor Varea: These meetings will occur weekly for 90 minutes each time. They will consist of discussions relating to assigned texts and at least one standalone article brought forth by the student each meeting (in process).
  • Short Written Responses: Each reading will require a two to three-page written response so that the student can critically engage with the material and connect it to her research question(s). These responses will become the foundation of the student’s 12-page term paper at the end of the semester.
  • Final Paper: The student will produce a 12-page paper where she will articulate the impact of Belize’s particular cultural and migratory landscape on its culture, with special focus on its educational system and its youth.

4-Credit Hour Breakdown

The time devoted by the student to fulfill the 4-units for the course will be 170 hours of work, broken down in the following manner:

  • 15-day immersion and on-site research work in Belize, Central America: 104 hours (8 hours, times 13 days).
  • Weekly meetings & discussion with faculty: 22 hours (11 meetings, 2 hours each).
  • Weekly out-of-class student work expectation: 44 (4 hours a week for a total of 11 weeks).

Grading

  • 25% Response Papers
  • 25% Discussion Sessions: Attendance and Preparedness
  • 50% Final Paper

Required Texts

Shoman, Assad, Belize’s Independence and Decolonization in Latin America: Guatemala, Britain, and the UN; Palgrave Mcmillan, New York, 2010

Lewis, Karla, "Colonial Education: A History of Education in Belize;" 29 pg. paper, 2000, ResearchGate (online)

Mwakikagile, Godfrey, Belize and Its Identity: A Multicultural Perspective; New Africa Press, Washington DC, 2010

General Course Guidelines

Academic Integrity

As a Jesuit institution committed to cura personalis -- the care and education of the whole person -- USF has an obligation to embody and foster the values of honesty and integrity. USF upholds the standards of honesty and integrity from all members of the academic community. All students are expected to know and adhere to the University's Honor Code. You can find the full text of the code online.

The policy covers:

  • Plagiarism — intentionally or unintentionally representing the words or ideas of another person as your own; failure to properly cite references; manufacturing references.
  • Working with another person when independent work is required.
  • Submission of the same paper in more than one course without the specific permission of each instructor.
  • Submitting a paper written by another person or obtained from the Internet.

Behavioral Expectations

All students are expected to behave in accordance with the Student Conduct Code. Students whose behavior is disruptive or who fail to comply with the instructor may be dismissed from the class for the remainder of the class period and may need to meet with the instructor or Dean prior to returning to the next class period. If necessary, referrals may also be made to the Student Conduct process for violations of the Student Conduct Code.

Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS)

CAPS’ diverse staff offers brief individual, couple, and group counseling to student members of our community. CAPS services are confidential and free of charge. Call (415) 422-6352 for an initial consultation appointment. Telephone consultation through CAPS After Hours is available Monday - Friday from 5:00 p.m. to 8:30 a.m., 24 hours during weekends and holidays; call the above number and press 2. Further information can be found on the CAPS website

Confidentiality, Mandatory Reporting, and Sexual Assault

As instructors, one of our responsibilities is to help create a safe learning environment on our campus. We also have a mandatory reporting responsibility related to our role as faculty. We are required to share information regarding sexual misconduct or information about a crime that may have occurred on USF’s campus with the University. Here are some useful resources related to sexual misconduct:

  • To report any sexual misconduct, students may visit the Title IX coordinator (UC 5th floor) or find other options on the USF student life page.
  • Students may speak to someone confidentially or report a sexual assault confidentially by contacting Counseling and Psychological Services at (415) 422-6352.
  • To find out more about reporting a sexual assault at USF, visit USFs Callisto website.
  • For an off-campus resource, contact San Francisco Women Against Rape (SFWAR) (415) 647-7273.

Course Schedule

Week One: February 26 – 2 hours
Meeting with professor: Reading Discussions

Week Two: March 5 – 2 hours
Meeting with professor: Reading Discussions and Short Response Paper 1 Due

Week Three: March 19 – 2 hours
Meeting with professor: Reading Discussions and Short Response Paper 2 Outline Due

Week Four: March 26 – 2 hours
Meeting with professor: Reading Discussions and Short Response Paper 2 Due

Week Five: April 2 – 2 hours
Meeting with professor: Short Response Paper 2 Discussion

Week Six: April 9 – 2 hours
Meeting with professor: Reading Discussions and Short Response Paper 3 Outline Due

Week Seven: April 16 – 2 hours
Meeting with professor: Reading Discussions and Short Response Paper 3 Due

Week Eight: April 23 – 2 hours
Meeting with professor: Short Response Paper 3 Discussion Final Paper Outline Due

Week Nine: April 30 – 2 hours
Meeting with professor: Final Paper Draft Due

Week Ten: May 7 – 2 hours
Meeting with professor: Final Paper Draft Feedback and Discussion

Week Eleven: May 14 – 2 hours
(Finals Week, no classes – Final’s meet – 2 hours (time can be moved if in conflict with student’s finals) Meeting with professor: Turn In and Discuss Final Paper FINAL PAPER DUE ON MONDAY MAY 14, 2:00 PM in KH334