Engaging

Photograph of two students looking at a computer monitor with code displayed

In this section, explore learning activities to engage your students and improve student comprehension.

Active Learning: Student Initiated Pedagogy

Active Learning: Student Initiated Pedagogy

Explore types of activities that will encourage students to initiate their own mastery of course concepts and content. Learn more about active learning pedagogies »

Clarity with Captioned Video

Clarity with Captioned Video

Use captioned videos in your course materials to increase students' access to content and to introduce new ways of thinking and teaching. Learn more about teaching with captioned videos »

Podcasts – Anytime and Anywhere

Podcasts: Anytime and Anywhere

Use podcasts in your teaching to provide students with opportunities to learn outside of traditional periods of study and diversify your teaching styles. Learn more about podcasting in your courses »

The Jigsaw Method: Putting Pieces Together

The Jigsaw Method: Putting Pieces Together

Dividing course readings and discussions encourages students to learn from and collaborate with others, while being accountable for their participation in a learning community. Learn more about the Jigsaw Method »

The Power of Discussion Boards

The Power of Discussion Boards

Discussion boards provide students with an avenue for participation and dialogue in an online environment. Learn more about using discussion boards »

Think-Pair-Share: An Active Learning Activity

Think-Pair-Share: An Active Learning Activity

Interested in encouraging students to hash out ideas collectively, both with peers sitting in proximity and with the group at large? Think-Pair-Share scaffolds student collaboration while allowing instructors to gauge concept mastery. Learn more about Think-Pair-Share »

Use Video to Connect With Your Students

Use Video to Connect With Your Students

Course introductory videos allow instructors to establish a social presence with their students, anchor course content, and point out critical information and expectations for their course. Learn more about teaching with videos »