ARM/ART Topics

FALL 2023

Clinical Neuroscience

ARM: Advanced Research Methods - PSYC 388 02 - 40947

Leighton Hinkley

TR 6:30 - 10:10 PM

The goal of this course is to offer students the opportunity to learn about Clinical Neuroscience (studying the biological foundation of disorders of the brain) and Translational Neuroscience (applying technological advances at the basic science level) to bring novel approaches to understanding of and interventions for patients with psychiatric and neurological disease. The course will span clinical advances at the cellular/molecular, systems neuroscience, cognitive neuroscience and neuroengineering levels, and how these advances have directly lead to innovations in diagnosis and treatment.

Creativity and Your Brain

ART: Advanced Research Theories - PSYC 387 01 - 40944

Indre Viskontas

TR 4:35 - 6:20 PM                      

What does it mean to be creative? How can we scientifically study creativity, given its inherent subjectivity? In this advanced research topics class, we explore various aspects of creative thinking and performance, and their neural signatures. Students are expected to have a basic understanding of effective psychological research design and statistics and to be able to critically evaluate scientific papers. The purpose of this advanced course is to give students the opportunity to put that knowledge into practice, to develop a board understanding of the neuroscience of creativity and look towards a future in which generative artificial intelligence plays a role in creative work. The assignments in this class are designed to strengthen and cement the research and critical thinking skills that students have developed in their coursework in psychology.

Family Systems Theory & Disney: Exploring Couple and Family Relationships

ART: Advanced Research Theories - PSYC 387 02 - 40945

Alex Ochoa

TR 8:00 - 9:45 AM

A major goal of the course is to introduce family systems concepts and explore the construction of the family presented in Disney films. By examining the content of several Disney films created within particular historical and cultural family contexts, we will develop and expand our understanding of the family systems and discuss the relationship tropes and themes that are prevalent in the films.

In Their Own Words: Using Qualitative Research to Tell Stories

ARM: Advanced Research Methods - PSYC 388 01 - 40946

Emily Schell

MW 4:45 - 6:20 PM

In this ARM course, we will take a deeper dive into different types of qualitative research approaches, such as observation, interviewing, and textual analysis, to learn how each method can help us investigate elements of the human experience that we might otherwise not be able to study. We will cover basic theoretical principles of qualitative inquiry and acquire a general understanding of how different qualitative methodologies work. Through  discussions and the completion of a student-created qualitative “mini study,” students will explore different ways of investigating our world in a scientific, but non-statistical, way that uplifts the voices of the people we are studying. The goal of this course is to help students develop skills in qualitative methods that will serve them well as a researcher or practitioner in psychology.

ACCULTURATION

ART: Advanced Research Topics - 21379 - PSYC 387 - 01

Kevin Chun

TR 9:55 AM - 11:40 AM

This advanced research topics course aims to expand students’ foundational knowledge of acculturation theory, assessment, and applied research.  The construct of acculturation has gained considerable attention in psychology over the past decade with increasing transnational migration and globalization.  Still, researchers continue to struggle over some fundamental and deceptively simple questions regarding the nature and study of acculturation – How should acculturation be conceptualized and defined? What are the best methods to assess the multidimensional and dynamic properties of acculturation? In what ways does acculturation affect health and psychosocial functioning?  This course provides students with the opportunity to explore these key conceptual and methodological questions. 

SOCIAL COGNITION AND MORAL DEVELOPMENT

ART: Advanced Research Topics - 21380 - PSYC 387 - 02

Aline Hitti

MW 10:30 AM - 12:15 PM

Moral and social cognitive judgments reflect complex social abilities that are necessary for individuals to function in diverse society. How these abilities develop and emerge in intergroup contexts will be the focus of this course. This topic involves understanding the outcomes of actions, others’ intentions, theory of mind, emotional evaluations, intergroup attitudes, and group identity. What age-related changes occur from early to late development? What is the role of peers, parents, teachers, and institutions in promoting (or hindering) moral and social cognitive development? When does a lack of these capacities become barriers for children in social situations (e.g., intergroup relationships)?  These questions are central for understanding children’s well-being, cognitive processing, healthy peer relationships, and their functioning as members of an increasingly diverse society. Foundational theoretical works as well as current empirical works that have addressed these questions will be reviewed and will form the basis for engaging class discussions.

CLOSE RELATIONSHIPS

ARM: Advanced Research Methods - 21381 - PSYC 388 - 01

Lily Ma

TR 4:35 PM - 6:20 PM

In this advanced research methods class, we will focus on the content area of close relationships. Students will be given the opportunity to learn about topics in close relationships (e.g., attraction, relationship maintenance, and conflicts). Students are expected to have an understanding of statistics and research methods. The purpose of this advanced course is to give students the opportunity to put that knowledge into practice. We will analyze studies based on close relationship research, design our own studies, and then collect and analyze the data from these studies. The assignments in this class are designed to strengthen and cement the research and critical thinking skills that you have developed in your coursework in psychology.

transformation and healing

ARM: Advanced Research Methods - 21382 - PSYC 388 - 02

Isabel Unanue

TR 12:45 PM - 2:30 PM

The goal of this course is for students to research transformation from a clinical-community psychology perspective. In community psychology, transformation is intimately linked with social justice and is defined as change that takes a system-wide perspective and addresses the root cause of the issue. How does this definition of transformation relate to inner transformation and healing, the type of transformation historically of interest to clinical psychologists? And, how can a phenomenon such as inner transformation and its relationship to outer transformation be measured and studied? In this course, students will explore this emergent area of research while simultaneously garnering skills in research design, analysis, writing, and presentation. Students interested in novel methods of inner transformation – such as meditation and trauma healing therapies - and their relationship to social justice are invited to join. By the end of the course, students will have acquired skills in data gathering, conducting literature reviews, critical evaluation of relevant theories and literature, and research conceptualization, design, and analysis.

Religion, spirituality, and health

PSYC 387 – 01 | ART: Advanced Research Topics |  41044

John Perez

MW  | 10:30 am-12:15 pm

How helpful or harmful are particular forms of religiousness or spirituality for particular people dealing with particular situations in particular social contexts?  This course will focus on the study of religiousness, spirituality, and health from a psychological perspective.  A major goal of the course is for students to develop the scientific mindedness to critically evaluate the growing body of research that links religious and spiritual beliefs and practices to various psychosocial and health outcomes including cancer, HIV/AIDS, substance abuse, mental health, sexual health, family functioning, and mortality.  Students will also examine religious and spiritual interventions that address physical and mental health among culturally diverse populations.  This course is a discussion-based seminar with a focus on evaluating the reliability and validity of original empirical research.  It fulfills the advanced research methods requirement in the Psychology major.


Social Influence

PSYC 388 – 01 | ARM: Advanced Research Methods | 41046

Saera Khan

TR | 09:55 am-11:40 am

Prerequisites: Students must have successfully completed General Psychology, Psychological Statistics, and Psychological Research Design and Social Psychology.


In this advanced research methods class, we will focus on the content area of current social psychology. Students are expected to have an understanding of statistics and research methods. The purpose of this advanced course is to give students the opportunity to put that knowledge into practice. We will analyze studies based on social psychology research, design our own studies, and then collect and analyze the data from these studies. The assignments in this class are designed to strengthen and cement the research and critical thinking skills that you have developed in your coursework in psychology.


Translating the Theory of Intersectionality into Research Practice: Can and how should it be done?

PSYC 388 – 02 | ARM: Advanced Research Methods | 41047

James Brennan

MW | 06:30 pm-08:15 pm

Intersectionality is a transformative framework for psychology and an essential lens for research that is directed toward social justice. Psychology research methods can be limited by single-axle analysis of demographic variables and can miss how different identities might intersect, how these intersecting identities might be operated on by systems of oppression differentially, and how these dynamics might influence relationships with psychological outcomes. In this course, we will explore the theoretical concept of intersectionality, review existing approaches to measuring intersectionality, develop a method for analyzing intersectionality that is theory-driven, and compare the relative insights derived from these different models. Students will be engaged in each part of the process, including data collection and analysis, and consider how their intersecting identities and their social positionality interplay with the research they’re engaged in.

 


Cognitive Neurotherapies

PSYC 388 – 03 | ART: Advanced Research Topics | 42256

David Ziegler

TR | 8:00 - 9:45 AM

This course will critically examine research on the effectiveness of different therapeutic approaches for several human neuropsychiatric, neurodevelopmental, and neurodegenerative illnesses – such as autism, ADHD, Alzheimer’s disease, and PTSD – that result from dysfunction in key brain systems. We will also discuss the use of these interventions for cognitive enhancement in healthy young adults. Therapies will include pharmaceutical agents, brain stimulation, cognitive training, lifestyle modifications (e.g., exercise and diet), and integrative practices (e.g., mind-body approaches). Students will learn about the design and conduct of Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) to evaluate the efficacy of interventions and will have an opportunity to conduct their own research project by analyzing publicly available data from one of several large-scale clinical trials of cognitive interventions.

Evidence-Based Therapies

PSYC 387 – 01 | ART: Advanced Research Topics

TR | 2:40 pm - 4:25 pm

This is a discussion-based seminar that will critically examine evidence-based psychotherapies for depression. Through reading research texts, class discussion, and watching and critiquing expert clinicians engaging in therapy, students will learn to evaluate clinical research and treatment strategies, in order to understand how empirical support for treatment effectiveness is amassed in mental health research.

We will also cover therapy protocols in depth, focusing primarily on Cognitive, Behavioral, and third-wave Cognitive Behavioral Treatments (such as Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Functional Analytic Psychotherapy, and Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy). Students will also be expected to role play select therapy protocols to increase familiarity with CBT for depression. This course is best suited for students interested in clinical/counseling or health professions.  


Neuropsychology of Aging

PSYC 387 – 02 | ART: Advanced Research Topics

Dr. David Ziegler

This seminar will critically examine the literature related to the psychology and neurobiology of healthy aging and neurodegenerative diseases. We will begin the semester by discussing research on the brain changes that occur during the course of healthy aging and the cognitive and psychological correlates of these neural changes. Specific emphasis will be placed on declines in attention and cognitive control, long-term memory, and emotional memory. We will then juxtapose these findings with research on the etiology and symptomatology of several neurodegenerative diseases.  Emphasis will again be placed on the cognitive and behavioral aspects of the diseases, including loss of memory function and emotional processing in Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal dementia and impulse control disorders in Parkinson’s disease. We will then end the semester by delving into emerging research on novel treatments and interventions designed to remediate cognitive decline. We will discuss how societal factors contribute to health disparities that place some older adults at higher risk of cognitive decline and how these factors might impact the availability and effectiveness of treatments. Throughout the semester, we will consider methodological issues that are central to research on aging and neurodegenerative disease, including evaluation of common neuroimaging techniques (fMRI, EEG, MEG, and PET), neuropsychological assessments, and issues related to the design and conduct of randomized clinical trials of cognitive interventions.


Measuring Creativity

PSYC 388 – 01 | ARM: Advanced Research Methods

Dr. Indre Viskontas

Prerequisites: Students must have successfully completed General Psychology, Psychological Statistics, Psychological Research Design and Biological Psychology.

What does it mean to be creative? How can we scientifically study creativity, given its inherent subjectivity? In this advanced research methods class, we explore several tools to measure various aspects of creative thinking and performance, as well as develop ideas for new tools. Students are expected to have a basic understanding of effective psychological research design and statistics. The purpose of this advanced course is to give students the opportunity to put that knowledge into practice, while also considering the challenges in evaluating and assessing creativity. The assignments in this class are designed to strengthen and cement the research and critical thinking skills that students have developed in their coursework in psychology. 


Clinical Neuroscience

PSYC 388 – 01 | ARM: Advanced Research Methods

Dr. Leighton Hinkley

The goal of this course is to offer students the opportunity to learn about Clinical Neuroscience (studying the biological foundation of disorders of the brain) and Translational Neuroscience (applying technological advances at the basic science level) to bring novel approaches to understanding of and interventions for patients with psychiatric and neurological disease. The course will span clinical advances at the cellular/molecular, systems neuroscience, cognitive neuroscience and neuroengineering levels, and how these advances have directly lead to innovations in diagnosis and treatment.

Fall 2021

Religion, spirituality, and health

PSYC 387 – 01 | ART: Advanced Research Topics | 41124

MW | 10:30 - 12:15 PM

How helpful or harmful are particular forms of religiousness or spirituality for particular people dealing with particular situations in particular social contexts?  This course will focus on the study of religiousness, spirituality, and health from a psychological perspective.  A major goal of the course is for students to develop the scientific mindedness to critically evaluate the growing body of research that links religious and spiritual beliefs and practices to various psychosocial and health outcomes including cancer, HIV/AIDS, substance abuse, mental health, sexual health, family functioning, and mortality.  Students will also examine religious and spiritual interventions that address physical and mental health among culturally diverse populations.  This course is a discussion-based seminar with a focus on evaluating the reliability and validity of original empirical research.  It fulfills the advanced research methods requirement in the Psychology major.

 

The creative brain

PSYC 387 – 02 | ART: Advanced Research Topics | 41125

Indre Viskontas

TR 2:40 - 4:25 PM

Describing the human experience has been the mission of artists since the first cave paintings. Scientists are equally interested in understanding our world and our place in it. With the advent of neuroscience, we’re starting to trace not only how our brains make us human but also how and why we appreciate great art. In this course, neuroscientist and musician Professor  Viskontas brings her two areas of expertise together to explore how our brains enable creativity and the neural rush associated with creating or consuming art. Students will develop a greater appreciation for what artists do, how expertise is developed, and how the arts enhance emotion and empathy in the brain. Is there a creativity center in the brain? Where does an ‘aha’ moment come from? Can music be medicine? Does mental illness lead to better art? Why do poets seem to die young? This course will also take students on a journey into the minds of great artists like Vincent Van Gogh, Maurice Ravel, Sylvia Plath, and others, whose work helps us better understand our own minds.

 

Social Influence

PSYC 388 – 01 | ARM: Advanced Research Methods | 41127

Saera Khan

TR 12:45 PM – 2:30 PM

Prerequisites: Students must have successfully completed General Psychology, Psychological Statistics, and Psychological Research Design and Social Psychology.


In this advanced research methods class, we will focus on the content area of current social psychology. Students are expected to have an understanding of statistics and research methods. The purpose of this advanced course is to give students the opportunity to put that knowledge into practice. We will analyze studies based on social psychology research, design our own studies, and then collect and analyze the data from these studies. The assignments in this class are designed to strengthen and cement the research and critical thinking skills that you have developed in your coursework in psychology.

 

Measurement and Scales

PSYC 388 – 02 | ARM: Advanced Research Methods | 41128

Violet Cheung

MW 12:20 PM – 2:05 PM

Measurement is a neglected area of training in both undergraduate and graduate studies of psychology. Before testing research hypotheses with sound designs, before calculating p-values with state-of-the-art statistics, a premise is that the variables involved are measured validly and reliably. Unlike physical quantities (such as weight and height), psychological constructs (such as self-esteem and religiosity) are elusive to capture accurately. Therefore, we will devote this class to measurement techniques commonly used in psychological research and in applied areas. We will start by learning the procedures in standardized tests, followed by readings on a range of topics from psychometrics to the techniques of scale construction. We will also practice test construction, administration, and validation. While some segments of the course can be delivered via instruction videos or learned through reading research articles, student attendance is paramount to the segments of the course that involve hands-on learning and group projects.

Evidence-based therapies

PSYC 387 - 01 | ART: Advanced Research Topics

Joyce Yang

MW 2:15 - 4:00 PM

Prerequisites: Students must have successfully completed General Psychology, Psychological Research Design, Psychological Statistics, and Abnormal Psychology
 
This is a discussion-based seminar that will critically examine evidence-based psychotherapies for depression. Through reading research articles and class discussion, students will learn to evaluate clinical research designs for testing psychological treatments, in order to understand how empirical support for treatment effectiveness is amassed in mental health research. We will also cover therapy protocols in depth, including Cognitive, Behavioral, and third-wave Cognitive Behavioral Treatments (such as Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Functional Analytic Psychotherapy, and Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy). This course aims to provide students with clinical research evaluation skills as well as familiarity with therapeutic principles and skills for the prevention and treatment of depression.

 

Creativity and the brain

PSYC 387 – 02 | ART: Advanced Research Topics

Indre Viskontas

TR 4:45 – 6:25 PM

Describing the human experience has been the mission of artists since the first cave paintings. Scientists are equally interested in understanding our world and our place in it. With the advent of neuroscience, we’re starting to trace not only how our brains make us human but also how and why we appreciate great art. In this course, neuroscientist and musician Professor  Viskontas brings her two areas of expertise together to explore how our brains enable creativity and the neural rush associated with creating or consuming art. Students will develop a greater appreciation for what artists do, how expertise is developed, and how the arts enhance emotion and empathy in the brain. Is there a creativity center in the brain? Where does an ‘aha’ moment come from? Can music be medicine? Does mental illness lead to better art? Why do poets seem to die young? This course will also take students on a journey into the minds of great artists like Vincent Van Gogh, Maurice Ravel, Sylvia Plath, and others, whose work helps us better understand our own minds.

 

Social Influence

PSYC 388 – 01 | ARM: Advanced Research Methods 

Saera Khan

TR 12:45 PM – 2:30 PM

Prerequisites: Students must have successfully completed General Psychology, Psychological Statistics, and Psychological Research Design and Social Psychology.


In this advanced research methods class, we will focus on the content area of current social psychology. Students are expected to have an understanding of statistics and research methods. The purpose of this advanced course is to give students the opportunity to put that knowledge into practice. We will analyze studies based on social psychology research, design our own studies, and then collect and analyze the data from these studies. The assignments in this class are designed to strengthen and cement the research and critical thinking skills that you have developed in your coursework in psychology.

 

Cognitive Neurotherapies

PSYC 388 – 02 | ART: Advanced Research Topics

David Zeigler

TR 8:00 - 9:45 AM

This course will critically examine research on the effectiveness of different therapeutic approaches for several human neuropsychiatric, neurodevelopmental, and neurodegenerative illnesses – such as autism, ADHD, Alzheimer’s disease, and PTSD – that result from dysfunction in key brain systems. We will also discuss the use of these interventions for cognitive enhancement in healthy young adults. Therapies will include pharmaceutical agents, brain stimulation, cognitive training, lifestyle modifications (e.g., exercise and diet), and integrative practices (e.g., mind-body approaches). Students will learn about the design and conduct of Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) to evaluate the efficacy of interventions and will have an opportunity to conduct their own research project by analyzing publicly available data from one of several large-scale clinical trials of cognitive interventions.

 

The Science of Moral Judgment

PSYC 387 – 03 | ART: Advanced Research Topics | 22722

Saera Khan

TR 9:55 - 11:40

Prerequisites: JR or SR who has successfully completed General Psychology, Research Design, and Social Psychology

In this class, we will focus on the content area of current moral psychology. The purpose of this advanced course is to give students the opportunity to put their knowledge of human behavior into practice. We will read and analyze studies based on moral psychology research, design our own studies, and propose new ways of examining moral behavior from a psychological and philosophical perspectives. The assignments in this class are designed to strengthen and cement the research and critical thinking skills that you have developed in your coursework in psychology.

 This course focuses heavily on group discussion. Active and thoughtful participation is a significant factor in your grade. It is expected that you will do the readings prior to the course meeting and will answer questions posed to you in class and in reflections. The objectives for this course is to expose you to a wide variety of readings, provide you with opportunities for written and verbal critique, help you practice communication and discussion with peers, and to foster interest and excitement about this emerging field of inquiry.

 This course will have a significant reading load and require that students are capable of either designing an innovative psychological experiment or writing a review paper emphasizing careful and sustained argumentation. 

Neuropsychology of aging

PSYC 387 – 01 | ART: Advanced Research Topics |41684

David Zeigler

TR 8:00 - 9:45 am

This seminar will critically examine the literature related to the psychology and neurobiology of healthy aging and neurodegenerative diseases. We will begin the semester by discussing research on the brain changes that occur during the course of healthy aging and the cognitive and psychological correlates of these neural changes. Specific emphasis will be placed on declines in attention and cognitive control, long-term memory, and emotional memory. We will then juxtapose these findings with research on the etiology and symptomatology of several neurodegenerative diseases.  Emphasis will again be placed on the cognitive and behavioral aspects of the diseases, including loss of memory function and emotional processing in Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal dementia and impulse control disorders in Parkinson’s disease. We will then end the semester by delving into emerging research on novel treatments and interventions designed to remediate cognitive decline. We will discuss how societal factors contribute to health disparities that place some older adults at higher risk of cognitive decline and how these factors might impact the availability and effectiveness of treatments. Throughout the semester, we will consider methodological issues that are central to research on aging and neurodegenerative disease, including evaluation of common neuroimaging techniques (fMRI, EEG, MEG, and PET), neuropsychological assessments, and issues related to the design and conduct of randomized clinical trials of cognitive interventions.

 

Creativity and the brain

PSYC 387 – 02 | ART: Advanced Research Topics |41685

Indre Viskontas

TR 6:30 – 8:15 PM

Describing the human experience has been the mission of artists since the first cave paintings. Scientists are equally interested in understanding our world and our place in it. With the advent of neuroscience, we’re starting to trace not only how our brains make us human but also how and why we appreciate great art. In this course, neuroscientist and musician Professor  Viskontas brings her two areas of expertise together to explore how our brains enable creativity and the neural rush associated with creating or consuming art. Students will develop a greater appreciation for what artists do, how expertise is developed, and how the arts enhance emotion and empathy in the brain. Is there a creativity center in the brain? Where does an ‘aha’ moment come from? Can music be medicine? Does mental illness lead to better art? Why do poets seem to die young? This course will also take students on a journey into the minds of great artists like Vincent Van Gogh, Maurice Ravel, Sylvia Plath, and others, whose work helps us better understand our own minds.

 

Social Influence

PSYC 388 – 01 | ARM: Advanced Research Methods |41686

Saera Khan

TR 12:45 PM – 2:30 PM

Prerequisites: Students must have successfully completed General Psychology, Psychological Statistics, and Psychological Research Design and Social Psychology.


In this advanced research methods class, we will focus on the content area of current social psychology. Students are expected to have an understanding of statistics and research methods. The purpose of this advanced course is to give students the opportunity to put that knowledge into practice. We will analyze studies based on social psychology research, design our own studies, and then collect and analyze the data from these studies. The assignments in this class are designed to strengthen and cement the research and critical thinking skills that you have developed in your coursework in psychology.

 

Values in Athletics

PSYC 388 – 02 | ARM: Advanced Research Methods |41687

Alexander Ochoa

MW 9:55 - 11:40 am

What differentiates athletes and communities in their values and what they view as important in athletic
sportsmanship? How does an athlete or a fan determine if an action in athletics is acceptable or unacceptable? What do athletes want out of their teammates, coaches, and fans? This course will provide students with an introduction to key concepts, theories, and principles of values in athletics and the application of psychological knowledge and principles to enhance sports behavior. We will then look at techniques and programs aimed at enhancing these concepts in sports and research findings on their relative effectiveness.  Throughout the course, we will analyze current studies in sports psychology, design our own research, and collect and analyze the data.

EMERGING ADULTHOOD

PSYC 387 – 01 | ART: Advanced Research Topics |

Ja’Nina Garrett-Walker

MW 8:35 AM – 10:20 AM

There are currently a lot of conversations happening in popular media about Millennials and Generation Z. However, what is missing from the conversation is an understanding of the developmental stage of Emerging Adulthood (18-25 years old). Emerging Adulthood is a very unique and industrialized developmental period. Each generation of emerging adults has its own unique strengths and challenges. This course is designed to give students an in-depth understanding of emerging adulthood. Students will be actively involved in reading, discussing, and critiquing research on this developmental stage. At the conclusion of the class, students should understand current research on emerging adulthood, be able to detail what characteristics distinguish this developmental stage from others, and utilize critical thinking to discuss the ways in which social constructions and expectations influence emerging adults. During the Spring 2020 semester, emerging adults are those born between 1995 and 2002.

EVIDENCE-BASED THERAPIES

PSYC 387 – 02 | ART: Advanced Research Topics |

Joyce Yang

TR 2:40 – 4:25 PM

Prerequisites: Students must have successfully completed General Psychology, Psychological Research Design, Psychological Statistics, and Abnormal Psychology

This is a discussion-based seminar that will critically examine evidence-based psychotherapies for depression. Through reading research articles and class discussion, students will learn to evaluate clinical research designs for testing psychological treatments, in order to understand how empirical support for treatment effectiveness is amassed in mental health research. We will also cover therapy protocols in depth, including Cognitive, Behavioral, and third-wave Cognitive Behavioral Treatments (such as Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Functional Analytic Psychotherapy, and Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy). This course aims to provide students with clinical research evaluation skills as well as familiarity with therapeutic principles and skills for the prevention and treatment of depression.

HOW TECHNOLOGY SHAPES THOUGHT

PSYC 388 – 01 | ARM: Advanced Research Methods |

Indre Viskontas

MW 2:15 PM – 4:00 PM

Socrates famously predicted that a new invention would turn our brains into mush: writing. The fear that technology will change how we think is not new. But the amount of time we now spend interacting with devices like cell phones, computers, and video games is unprecedented. What is the effect of ubiquitous technology on our brains? Is Google slowly destroying our memory? Have our attention spans been decimated by scrolling through Facebook feeds and Twitter? What does science say about the relative impact on kids of smartphones, with their constant text, Instagram, and Snapchat interruptions?  By outsourcing menial mental tasks like navigating through a city or remembering facts, are we sacrificing our brain’s potential? Or are we leaving ourselves more time for deep thinking and creativity, human traits that arguably can’t be beat by artificial intelligence? In this class, we will survey the findings in this emerging field of research, and use the internet to collect and interpret data relevant to the topic at hand. 

VALUES IN ATHLETICS

PSYC 388 – 02 | ARM: Advanced Research Methods |

Alex Ochoa

MW 12:20 PM – 2:05 PM

What differentiates athletes and communities in their values and what they view as important in athletic sportsmanship? How does an athlete or a fan determine if an action in athletics is acceptable or unacceptable? What do athletes want out of their teammates, coaches, and fans? This course will provide students with an introduction to key concepts, theories, and principles of values in athletics and the application of psychological knowledge and principles to enhance sports behavior. We will then look at techniques and programs aimed at enhancing these concepts in sports and research findings on their relative effectiveness.  Throughout the course, we will analyze current studies in sports psychology, design our own research, and collect and analyze the data. 

Mass Emotions in Politics

PSYC 387 – 01 |ART: Advanced Research Topics | 41882

Violet Cheung

MW 12:20 PM – 2:05 PM

While the role of mass emotions in visceral politics seems obvious, the specific ways that emotions shape political discourse are not well-understood. A case in point is Michael Moore’s 2004 documentary film Fahrenheit 911, which accused President George W. Bush of relying on fear tactics to garner public support for the invasion of Iraq. Any researcher versed in emotion theories would posit anger as the most salient emotion with regard to rallying the public behind military action. In this course, students will start by learning major emotion theories, especially the differences between the dimensional and discrete approaches. Students will then read research articles to learn the roles of specific emotions in a variety of political topics, from the wars in the Middle East to the ongoing cyberwar with China, from the Patriot Act to the migrant crisis. At the end of the course, students will write a term paper to propose an education program. Specifically, they will design ways to profile voters social media accounts, identify emotional voters, and design an education program to promote emotional awareness.

 

Emotional Intelligence

PSYC 387 – 02 |ART: Advanced Research Topics | 41883

Davina Chan

TR 8:00 – 9:45 AM

This course will examine research on emotional intelligence, methods for developing emotional intelligence, and controversies within the field.  It will begin with a discussion of the various components of emotional intelligence, including the ability to identify and manage one’s emotions, successfully motivate oneself to achieve one’s goals, perceive other people’s emotions accurately, and use emotions to navigate social relationships effectively.  We will then turn to look assessment of emotional intelligence, as well as assessment of the effectiveness of techniques and programs aimed at enhancing emotional intelligence in academic, work, and clinical settings.  Material will be taken from cognitive neuroscience, as well as social and clinical psychology, and will include topics ranging from brain imaging studies on truth wizards, optimists, and effects of mindfulness, to evidence-based therapeutic techniques for cultivating positive emotions and transforming negative emotions.  The course fulfills the advanced research methods requirement in the Psychology major.

 

Cognitive Neurotherapies

PSYC 388 – 01 |ARM: Advanced Research Methods | 41884

David Ziegler

TR 4:35 PM – 6:20 PM

This course will critically examine research on the effectiveness of different therapeutic approaches for several human neuropsychiatric, neurodevelopmental, and neurodegenerative illnesses – such as autism, ADHD, Alzheimer’s disease, and PTSD – that result from dysfunction in key brain systems. We will also discuss the use of these interventions for cognitive enhancement in healthy young adults. Therapies will include pharmaceutical agents, brain stimulation, cognitive training, lifestyle modifications (e.g., exercise and diet), and integrative practices (e.g., mind-body approaches). Students will learn about the design and conduct of Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) to evaluate the efficacy of interventions and will have an opportunity to conduct their own research project by analyzing publicly available data from one of several large-scale clinical trials of cognitive interventions.

 

How Technology Shapes Thought

PSYC 388 – 02 |ARM: Advanced Research Methods | 41885

Indre Viskontas

TR 9:55 AM – 11:40 AM

Socrates famously predicted that a new invention would turn our brains into mush: writing. The fear that technology will change how we think is not new. But the amount of time we now spend interacting with devices like cell phones, computers, and video games is unprecedented. What is the effect of ubiquitous technology on our brains? Is Google slowly destroying our memory? Have our attention spans been decimated by scrolling through Facebook feeds and Twitter? What does science say about the relative impact on kids of smartphones, with their constant text, Instagram, and Snapchat interruptions?  By outsourcing menial mental tasks like navigating through a city or remembering facts, are we sacrificing our brain’s potential? Or are we leaving ourselves more time for deep thinking and creativity, human traits that arguably can’t be beat by artificial intelligence? In this class, we will survey the findings in this emerging field of research, and use the internet to collect and interpret data relevant to the topic at hand. 

Myths and Mysteries of the Brain

PSYC 387 – 01 |ART: Advanced Research Topics | 21577

Indre Viskontas

MW 10:30 AM – 12:15 PM

Popular beliefs abound about how our brains work, and we’re all experts when it comes to our own minds. Or are we? Do we only use 10 percent of our brains? Does drinking alcohol kill brain cells? Can puzzles like Sudoku keep mature brains young? Neuroscience research shows us that we’re not very good at understanding our own brains. This course will explore the neuroscience of everyday life through brain myths and mysteries, replacing false conceptions with scientific findings and the great lessons we can draw from them.  You will learn how neuroscience lends its insights to a surprisingly diverse array of profound questions: What is consciousness? Why do we sometimes hold onto false beliefs? How do we make decisions? What is the true promise of neuroplasticity? Learn where neuroscience has conquered the human mind – and what uncharted territory remains.  This course is a discussion-based seminar focused on popular (mis) interpretations of neuroscience and psychology and the original scientific research that calls them into question. It fulfills the advanced research methods requirement in the Psychology major.

 

Neuropsychology of Aging

PSYC 387 – 02 |ART: Advanced Research Topics | 21578

David Ziegler

TR 8:00 – 9:45 AM


This seminar will critically examine the literature related to the psychology and neurobiology of healthy aging and neurodegenerative diseases. We will begin the semester by discussing research on the brain changes that occur during the course of healthy aging and the cognitive and psychological correlates of these neural changes. Specific emphasis will be placed on declines in attention and cognitive control, long-term memory, and emotional memory. We will then juxtapose these findings with research on the etiology and symptomatology of several neurodegenerative diseases.  Emphasis will again be placed on the cognitive and behavioral aspects of the diseases, including loss of memory function and emotional processing in Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal dementia and impulse control disorders in Parkinson’s disease. We will then end the semester by delving into emerging research on novel treatments and interventions designed to remediate cognitive decline. We will discuss how societal factors contribute to health disparities that place some older adults at higher risk of cognitive decline and how these factors might impact the availability and effectiveness of treatments. Throughout the semester, we will consider methodological issues that are central to research on aging and neurodegenerative disease, including evaluation of common neuroimaging techniques (fMRI, EEG, MEG, and PET), neuropsychological assessments, and issues related to the design and conduct of randomized clinical trials of cognitive interventions.

 

Social Influence

PSYC 388 – 01 |ARM: Advanced Research Methods | 21579

Saera Khan

TR 9:55 – 11:40 AM

Prerequisites: Students must have successfully completed General Psychology, Psychological Statistics, Psychological Research Design, and Social Psychology.


In this advanced research methods class, we will focus on the content area of current social psychology. Students are expected to have an understanding of statistics and research methods. The purpose of this advanced course is to give students the opportunity to put that knowledge into practice. We will analyze studies based on social psychology research, design our own studies, and then collect and analyze the data from these studies. The assignments in this class are designed to strengthen and cement the research and critical thinking skills that you have developed in your coursework in psychology.

 

Clinical Research In Mental Illness

PSYC 388 – 02 |ARM: Advanced Research Methods | 21580

Jeremy Doughan

TR 6:30 – 8:15 PM

This course will critically examine clinical research on the diagnosis, assessment and effectiveness of different therapeutic approaches to mental illness. The goal is to evaluate current research protocols, as well as understand how interventions have impacted mental health science.

Research reviews will consist of psychopharmacological treatments, psychotherapies, and alternative biological treatments, such as deep brain stimulation and ECT.  Students will learn to evaluate research designs involved with mental illness and analyze several clinical datasets.