ARM/ART Topics

Spring 2020 – ARM/ART Offerings

 

Emerging Adulthood

PSYC 387 – 01 | ART: Advanced Research Topics |

Ja’Nina Garrett-Walker

MW 8:35 AM – 10:20 AM

There are currently a lot of conversations happening in popular media about Millennials and Generation Z. However, what is missing from the conversation is an understanding of the developmental stage of Emerging Adulthood (18-25 years old). Emerging Adulthood is a very unique and industrialized developmental period. Each generation of emerging adults has its own unique strengths and challenges. This course is designed to give students an in-depth understanding of emerging adulthood. Students will be actively involved in reading, discussing, and critiquing research on this developmental stage. At the conclusion of the class, students should understand current research on emerging adulthood, be able to detail what characteristics distinguish this developmental stage from others, and utilize critical thinking to discuss the ways in which social constructions and expectations influence emerging adults. During the Spring 2020 semester, emerging adults are those born between 1995 and 2002.

Evidence-Based Therapies

PSYC 387 – 02 | ART: Advanced Research Topics |

Joyce Yang

TR 2:40 – 4:25 PM

Prerequisites: Students must have successfully completed General Psychology, Psychological Research Design, Psychological Statistics, and Abnormal Psychology

This is a discussion-based seminar that will critically examine evidence-based psychotherapies for depression. Through reading research articles and class discussion, students will learn to evaluate clinical research designs for testing psychological treatments, in order to understand how empirical support for treatment effectiveness is amassed in mental health research. We will also cover therapy protocols in depth, including Cognitive, Behavioral, and third-wave Cognitive Behavioral Treatments (such as Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Functional Analytic Psychotherapy, and Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy). This course aims to provide students with clinical research evaluation skills as well as familiarity with therapeutic principles and skills for the prevention and treatment of depression.

How Technology Shapes Thought

PSYC 388 – 01 | ARM: Advanced Research Methods |

Indre Viskontas

MW 2:15 PM – 4:00 PM

Socrates famously predicted that a new invention would turn our brains into mush: writing. The fear that technology will change how we think is not new. But the amount of time we now spend interacting with devices like cell phones, computers, and video games is unprecedented. What is the effect of ubiquitous technology on our brains? Is Google slowly destroying our memory? Have our attention spans been decimated by scrolling through Facebook feeds and Twitter? What does science say about the relative impact on kids of smartphones, with their constant text, Instagram, and Snapchat interruptions?  By outsourcing menial mental tasks like navigating through a city or remembering facts, are we sacrificing our brain’s potential? Or are we leaving ourselves more time for deep thinking and creativity, human traits that arguably can’t be beat by artificial intelligence? In this class, we will survey the findings in this emerging field of research, and use the internet to collect and interpret data relevant to the topic at hand. 

Values in Athletics

PSYC 388 – 02 | ARM: Advanced Research Methods |

Alex Ochoa

MW 12:20 PM – 2:05 PM

What differentiates athletes and communities in their values and what they view as important in athletic sportsmanship? How does an athlete or a fan determine if an action in athletics is acceptable or unacceptable? What do athletes want out of their teammates, coaches, and fans? This course will provide students with an introduction to key concepts, theories, and principles of values in athletics and the application of psychological knowledge and principles to enhance sports behavior. We will then look at techniques and programs aimed at enhancing these concepts in sports and research findings on their relative effectiveness.  Throughout the course, we will analyze current studies in sports psychology, design our own research, and collect and analyze the data. 

Mass Emotions in Politics

PSYC 387 – 01 |ART: Advanced Research Topics | 41882

Violet Cheung

MW 12:20 PM – 2:05 PM

While the role of mass emotions in visceral politics seems obvious, the specific ways that emotions shape political discourse are not well-understood. A case in point is Michael Moore’s 2004 documentary film Fahrenheit 911, which accused President George W. Bush of relying on fear tactics to garner public support for the invasion of Iraq. Any researcher versed in emotion theories would posit anger as the most salient emotion with regard to rallying the public behind military action. In this course, students will start by learning major emotion theories, especially the differences between the dimensional and discrete approaches. Students will then read research articles to learn the roles of specific emotions in a variety of political topics, from the wars in the Middle East to the ongoing cyberwar with China, from the Patriot Act to the migrant crisis. At the end of the course, students will write a term paper to propose an education program. Specifically, they will design ways to profile voters social media accounts, identify emotional voters, and design an education program to promote emotional awareness.

 

Emotional Intelligence

PSYC 387 – 02 |ART: Advanced Research Topics | 41883

Davina Chan

TR 8:00 – 9:45 AM

This course will examine research on emotional intelligence, methods for developing emotional intelligence, and controversies within the field.  It will begin with a discussion of the various components of emotional intelligence, including the ability to identify and manage one’s emotions, successfully motivate oneself to achieve one’s goals, perceive other people’s emotions accurately, and use emotions to navigate social relationships effectively.  We will then turn to look assessment of emotional intelligence, as well as assessment of the effectiveness of techniques and programs aimed at enhancing emotional intelligence in academic, work, and clinical settings.  Material will be taken from cognitive neuroscience, as well as social and clinical psychology, and will include topics ranging from brain imaging studies on truth wizards, optimists, and effects of mindfulness, to evidence-based therapeutic techniques for cultivating positive emotions and transforming negative emotions.  The course fulfills the advanced research methods requirement in the Psychology major.

 

Cognitive Neurotherapies

PSYC 388 – 01 |ARM: Advanced Research Methods | 41884

David Ziegler

TR 4:35 PM – 6:20 PM

This course will critically examine research on the effectiveness of different therapeutic approaches for several human neuropsychiatric, neurodevelopmental, and neurodegenerative illnesses – such as autism, ADHD, Alzheimer’s disease, and PTSD – that result from dysfunction in key brain systems. We will also discuss the use of these interventions for cognitive enhancement in healthy young adults. Therapies will include pharmaceutical agents, brain stimulation, cognitive training, lifestyle modifications (e.g., exercise and diet), and integrative practices (e.g., mind-body approaches). Students will learn about the design and conduct of Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) to evaluate the efficacy of interventions and will have an opportunity to conduct their own research project by analyzing publicly available data from one of several large-scale clinical trials of cognitive interventions.

 

How Technology Shapes Thought

PSYC 388 – 02 |ARM: Advanced Research Methods | 41885

Indre Viskontas

TR 9:55 AM – 11:40 AM

Socrates famously predicted that a new invention would turn our brains into mush: writing. The fear that technology will change how we think is not new. But the amount of time we now spend interacting with devices like cell phones, computers, and video games is unprecedented. What is the effect of ubiquitous technology on our brains? Is Google slowly destroying our memory? Have our attention spans been decimated by scrolling through Facebook feeds and Twitter? What does science say about the relative impact on kids of smartphones, with their constant text, Instagram, and Snapchat interruptions?  By outsourcing menial mental tasks like navigating through a city or remembering facts, are we sacrificing our brain’s potential? Or are we leaving ourselves more time for deep thinking and creativity, human traits that arguably can’t be beat by artificial intelligence? In this class, we will survey the findings in this emerging field of research, and use the internet to collect and interpret data relevant to the topic at hand. 

Myths and Mysteries of the Brain

PSYC 387 – 01 |ART: Advanced Research Topics | 21577

Indre Viskontas

MW 10:30 AM – 12:15 PM

Popular beliefs abound about how our brains work, and we’re all experts when it comes to our own minds. Or are we? Do we only use 10 percent of our brains? Does drinking alcohol kill brain cells? Can puzzles like Sudoku keep mature brains young? Neuroscience research shows us that we’re not very good at understanding our own brains. This course will explore the neuroscience of everyday life through brain myths and mysteries, replacing false conceptions with scientific findings and the great lessons we can draw from them.  You will learn how neuroscience lends its insights to a surprisingly diverse array of profound questions: What is consciousness? Why do we sometimes hold onto false beliefs? How do we make decisions? What is the true promise of neuroplasticity? Learn where neuroscience has conquered the human mind – and what uncharted territory remains.  This course is a discussion-based seminar focused on popular (mis) interpretations of neuroscience and psychology and the original scientific research that calls them into question. It fulfills the advanced research methods requirement in the Psychology major.

 

Neuropsychology of Aging

PSYC 387 – 02 |ART: Advanced Research Topics | 21578

David Ziegler

TR 8:00 – 9:45 AM


This seminar will critically examine the literature related to the psychology and neurobiology of healthy aging and neurodegenerative diseases. We will begin the semester by discussing research on the brain changes that occur during the course of healthy aging and the cognitive and psychological correlates of these neural changes. Specific emphasis will be placed on declines in attention and cognitive control, long-term memory, and emotional memory. We will then juxtapose these findings with research on the etiology and symptomatology of several neurodegenerative diseases.  Emphasis will again be placed on the cognitive and behavioral aspects of the diseases, including loss of memory function and emotional processing in Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal dementia and impulse control disorders in Parkinson’s disease. We will then end the semester by delving into emerging research on novel treatments and interventions designed to remediate cognitive decline. We will discuss how societal factors contribute to health disparities that place some older adults at higher risk of cognitive decline and how these factors might impact the availability and effectiveness of treatments. Throughout the semester, we will consider methodological issues that are central to research on aging and neurodegenerative disease, including evaluation of common neuroimaging techniques (fMRI, EEG, MEG, and PET), neuropsychological assessments, and issues related to the design and conduct of randomized clinical trials of cognitive interventions.

 

Social Influence

PSYC 388 – 01 |ARM: Advanced Research Methods | 21579

Saera Khan

TR 9:55 – 11:40 AM

Prerequisites: Students must have successfully completed General Psychology, Psychological Statistics, Psychological Research Design, and Social Psychology.


In this advanced research methods class, we will focus on the content area of current social psychology. Students are expected to have an understanding of statistics and research methods. The purpose of this advanced course is to give students the opportunity to put that knowledge into practice. We will analyze studies based on social psychology research, design our own studies, and then collect and analyze the data from these studies. The assignments in this class are designed to strengthen and cement the research and critical thinking skills that you have developed in your coursework in psychology.

 

Clinical Research In Mental Illness

PSYC 388 – 02 |ARM: Advanced Research Methods | 21580

Jeremy Doughan

TR 6:30 – 8:15 PM

This course will critically examine clinical research on the diagnosis, assessment and effectiveness of different therapeutic approaches to mental illness. The goal is to evaluate current research protocols, as well as understand how interventions have impacted mental health science.

Research reviews will consist of psychopharmacological treatments, psychotherapies, and alternative biological treatments, such as deep brain stimulation and ECT.  Students will learn to evaluate research designs involved with mental illness and analyze several clinical datasets.

Social Cognition and Moral Development

ART: Advanced Research Topics - 41401 - PSYC 387 - 01

Aline Hitti

MW 10:30 AM - 12:15 PM

Moral and social cognitive judgments reflect complex social abilities that are necessary for individuals to function in diverse society. How these abilities develop and emerge in intergroup contexts will be the focus of this course. This topic involves understanding the outcomes of actions, others’ intentions, theory of mind, emotional evaluations, intergroup attitudes, and group identity. What age-related changes occur from early to late development? What is the role of peers, parents, teachers, and institutions in promoting (or hindering) moral and social cognitive development? When does a lack of these capacities become barriers for children in social situations (e.g., intergroup relationships)?  These questions are central for understanding children’s well-being, cognitive processing, healthy peer relationships, and their functioning as members of an increasingly diverse society. Foundational theoretical works as well as current empirical works that have addressed these questions will be reviewed and will form the basis for engaging class discussions.

 

Emotion, Relationships, and Health

ART: Advanced Research Topics - 41402 - PSYC 387 - 02

Anya Kogan

MW 8:35 AM - 10:20 AM

This course will focus on examining the interconnection between emotions, relationships, and health. We will start by reviewing theories of emotion and emotion regulation, which will help us understand how emotions and our attempts to regulate them can have both positive and adverse impacts on health. We will also examine the construct of chronic stress, effective and ineffective strategies of coping, and how stress can get under our skin. We will then extend this knowledge to examine how stress is experienced and emotions are regulated within close relationships, and review potential mechanisms through which close relationships may affect our health and well-being. The material for this course combines theoretical and empirical literature from clinical, health, and social psychology, which will form the basis for engaging discussions.

 

SPSS Data Analysis

ARM: Advanced Research Methods - 41403 - PSYC 388 - 01

Michael Bloch

TR 2:40 PM – 4:25 PM

Students were given brief experience with SPSS in both their Psychological Statistics and Research Design courses. SPSS is the leading software program for analyzing data in the Social Sciences. In this course we will delve more deeply into how to use SPSS for analyzing data collected using a wide variety of experimental designs. This course should be extremely helpful for those pursuing graduate work in the Social Sciences (e.g., Psychology, Sociology, Economics), Education, and related fields. It is also geared towards students who are not decided on whether to pursue graduate work or not, but want to learn more about hypothesis testing and data analysis. This class will consist of class discussions, ‘hands-on’ instructor led computer exercises, and creation/completion of individual projects.

 

Evaluating Childhood ADHD

ARM: Advanced Research Methods - 41404 - PSYC 388 - 03

Lauren Haack

TR 8:00 AM - 9:45 AM

This course is designed to give students and in-depth understanding and practice of the current research methodologies utilized to evaluate childhood Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Topics include mixed method (i.e., qualitative and quantitative) investigation of ADHD conceptualization and prevalence, assessment instrument development and validation, single-subject treatment designs, randomized controlled trials, mechanisms of change, cultural adaptation and implementation/dissemination techniques.